9×9: Nine little films about food and farming

Positive stories from the frontline

A Festival of Seeds

A Festival of Seeds ~ UKThe final film in the 9×9 online film festival celebrates all that we have seen so far.A Festival of Seeds covers the Great Seed Festival which took place in October, 2014. The festival was organised to raise awareness of the importance of seed, and to celebrate seed, food and biodiversity. In this film we hear some of most progressive voices in the UK’s movement against corporate food plutocracy.The Source Project tweet

Posted by The Rules on Sunday, 19 July 2015 tweet

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A Festival of Seeds covers the Great Seed Festival which took place in October, 2014. The festival was organised to raise awareness of the importance of seed, and to celebrate seed, food and biodiversity. In this film we hear some of most progressive voices in the UK’s movement against corporate food plutocracy.

See all films.

9×9: Nine Little Films About Food and Farming

These films have been made for one reason: to help people understand the reality of what’s really happening to the world’s food and farming systems, and why.

“The Source Project was set up to work in a more holistic way within the development media, as the likes of the World Bank and Bill and Melinda Gates foundation begin to transform the development sector into a business driven model. By changing the way we live and operate, we are able to use our limited funds to help subsidize films that we feel need to be made. By creating a short film format the media can then be easily watched and shared on various social media platforms. We feel that this way we are able to not only help counter an imbalance of misinformation within development media but also stimulate consciousness on issues that otherwise would pass unnoticed. At the heart of the Source Project is agriculture, a system, not only of food production but also one that maintains our ecosystem, our cultures, our health and the very survival of humanity.”

For more about The Source Project, visit their website www.thesourceimage.com

The way we grow and distribute food says so much about global affairs, and will help determine the sort of future we can look forward to. Right now, there is a battle going on for who controls this system – the many, or the few. The few come in the guise of large agribusiness corporations and their government backers, whose vision is for a world of industrialised, intensive farming, that relies on the use of GMO seeds, fossil-fuel based pesticides and fertilisers, and centrally controlled global supply-chains. Their claim is that only they can feed the world. The alternative vision, that we at The Rules support, is that the people who are already supplying at least 70% the world’s food – the smallholder farmers – be supported in the way that, right now, only corporations are supported, with investment and subsidies. Smallholders naturally work in harmony with the earth and offer a solution to climate change, rather than trying to dominate nature and thereby drive climate change; they represent a diverse base of power, rather than hierarchies of centralised control; and their ability to feed the world is well-proven.

All Films

Not a Very Green Revolution ~ Punjab, India

Not a Very Green Revolution ~ Punjab, IndiaWe begin the 9×9 online festival with a film about India’s much hyped Green Revolution. Food policy analyst Devinder Sharma explains the event that was ‘the Green Revolution’ and how over the past 50 years, it has changed agriculture more than it has over the past 10 thousand. A system designed and developed, not for long-term food security or sustainability but for the control and manipulation of our global food systems. For the first few decades the world celebrated the Indian government’s new corporate-driven policy as statistics were mutated to convince the world of this modern technology’s success. The reality however is that in recent years, the true cost of this ‘experiment’ has begun to become ever more apparent to the farmers and communities of Punjab, the ‘Bread Basket’ of India. tweet

Posted by The Rules on Sunday, July 12, 2015 tweet

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We interviewed food policy analyst Devinder Sharma in Delhi where he explained to us the event that was ‘the Green Revolution’ and how over the past 50 years, has changed agriculture more than it has over the past 10 thousand. A system designed and developed, not for long-term food security or sustainability but for the control and manipulation of our global food systems. For the first few decades the world celebrated the Indian government’s new corporate-driven policy as statistics were mutated to convince the world of this modern technology’s success. The reality however is that in recent years, the true cost of this ‘experiment’ has begun to become ever more apparent to the farmers and communities of Punjab, the ‘Bread Basket’ of India.

Natural Systems and an Agricultural Philosophy ~ Punjab, India

Natural Systems and an Agricultural Philosophy ~ Punjab, IndiaIt has been proved, beyond doubt that the natural systems of farming benefit, not only human health but also the health of the environment in a long term and sustainable way. Natural Systems and an Agricultural Philosophy, the second film in 9×9 film festival, explains the same in the context of India. In the previous film we saw the real, long term impact of the Green Revolution on India’s farmers. This film, one of the first by The Source Project, looks at the cause, the symptom and finally a possible solution by one of the more progressive farmers in Punjab, Amarjeet Sharma. tweet

Posted by The Rules on Monday, July 13, 2015 tweet

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It has been proved, beyond doubt that the natural systems of farming benefit, not only human health but also the health of the environment in a long term and sustainable way. Natural Systems and an Agricultural Philosophy, the second film in 9×9 film festival, explains the same in the context of India. In the previous film we saw the real, long term impact of the Green Revolution on India’s farmers. This film, one of the first by The Source Project, looks at the cause, the symptom and finally a possible solution by one of the more progressive farmers in Punjab, Amarjeet Sharma.

Adolfo, a future farm ~ El Salvador

Adolfo, a future farm ~ El SalvadorIn the next of our 9 films about food and farming meet Adolfo. Adolfo is the district’s most progressive organic farmer with sixty varieties of crop. He has now begun to grow rice between his corn, his argument is, is that if the valley floods he has a rice crop, if there is a drought, he has a corn crop and if the weather is normal he can harvest both. He is obsessed with his truly biodiverse farm, hurrying around like an excited child pointing out to us hidden crops hanging off trees or sticking out of the ground. With shifting climates, Aldolfo believes that organic traditional agricultural practice and crop diversification is the only way to survive.”As with every community I have ever visited, there is a growing realisation that the so called agro-chemical industry has let them down. Despite their claims, hybrid and GMO seed is not good when it comes to adaptability, it was never designed that way. You measure the inputs then guarantee the outputs, the commodification of agriculture.” Jason Taylor, The Source Project tweet

Posted by The Rules on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 tweet

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In the next of our 9 films about food and farming meet Adolfo. Adolfo is the district’s most progressive organic farmer with sixty varieties of crop. He has now begun to grow rice between his corn, his argument is, is that if the valley floods he has a rice crop, if there is a drought, he has a corn crop and if the weather is normal he can harvest both. He is obsessed with his truly biodiverse farm, hurrying around like an excited child pointing out to us hidden crops hanging off trees or sticking out of the ground. With shifting climates, Aldolfo believes that organic traditional agricultural practice and crop diversification is the only way to survive.

“As with every community I have ever visited, there is a growing realisation that the so called agro-chemical industry has let them down. Despite their claims, hybrid and GMO seed is not good when it comes to adaptability, it was never designed that way. You measure the inputs then guarantee the outputs, the commodification of agriculture.” Jason Taylor, The Source Project

A Commons Sense ~West Bengal/Odisha India

A Commons Sense ~West Bengal/Odisha IndiaThe next film looks at those resisting the attempts to patent and control nature.Dr Debal Deb is possibly one of, if not, the most progressive scientists working in the field of agriculture. Having already saved over 1200 varieties of indigenous rice, Dr Deb continues to work, more or less un-funded. This film by The Source Project is the story of how scientists like him and several village communities and farmers in India are fighting biopiracy and preserving biodiversity. tweet

Posted by The Rules on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 tweet

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Dr Debal Deb is possibly one of, if not, the most progressive scientists working in the field of agriculture. Having already saved over 1200 varieties of indigenous rice, Dr Deb continues to work, more or less un-funded.

This film by The Source Project is the story of how scientists like him and several village communities and farmers in India are fighting biopiracy and preserving biodiversity.

Mother‘s Earth ~ Odisha, India

Mother‘s Earth ~ Odisha, IndiaWhen we think of farmers, we tend to think of men, but the reality is that at least 50% of all the world’s food is produced by women. In Mother’s Earth, we meet small communities of subsistence farmers from one of the more remote areas of Odisha, eastern India. Rather than surviving on an economically driven mono-crop system, the women of the community plant a variety of vegetables supplying them and their family with not only an income but also a diverse source of nutrition.Watch this poignant film by The Source Project about the protectors of India’s diverse agriculture. tweet

Posted by The Rules on Wednesday, July 15, 2015 tweet

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When we think of farmers, we tend to think of men, but the reality is that at least 50% of all the world’s food is produced by women.

In Mother’s Earth, we meet small communities of subsistence farmers from one of the more remote areas of Odisha, eastern India. Rather than surviving on an economically driven mono-crop system, the women of the community plant a variety of vegetables supplying them and their family with not only an income but also a diverse source of nutrition.

Watch this poignant film by The Source Project about the protectors of India’s diverse agriculture.

A Shifting Culture

A Shifting CultureYousef belongs to the Gujjar community, a semi-nomadic group living in the valleys and mountains of the Kashmiri Himalayas, India. The people of his community and millions of others like them are not only beginning to lose their strong cultural identity but also their relationship with their environment and with it the possibility of a truly sustainable future.It is not so much about whether life will change, it’s more about how life will change and who will really benefit.Film by: The Source ProjectMusic by Ensemble Ibn Arabi ensembleibnarabi.com/ tweet

Posted by The Rules on Friday, July 17, 2015 tweet

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Yousef belongs to the Gujjar community, a semi-nomadic group living in the valleys and mountains of the Kashmiri Himalayas, India. The people of his community and millions of others like them are not only beginning to lose their strong cultural identity but also their relationship with their environment and with it the possibility of a truly sustainable future.It is not so much about whether life will change, it’s more about how life will change and who will really benefit.

Film by: The Source Project

A Forest of Fortune

A Forest of Fortune ~ Borneo, Indonesia
A Forest of Fortune is a film about managed agro-forestry in Borneo where coal mines are ripping through the island.Ayal Kasal chief of a community was offered $200,000 for the community land by one of Indonesia’s largest coal mining companies. Ayal knew better. He had seen other communities that had sold their land and heard their stories. In this short film, he explains the reasoning behind his decision and his philosophy that puts his community and their future generations at the centre of his planning.The Source Project tweet

Posted by The Rules on Friday, 17 July 2015 tweet

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Ayal Kasal chief of a community was offered $200,000 for the community land by one of Indonesia’s largest coal mining companies. Ayal knew better.

He had seen other communities that had sold their land and heard their stories. In this short film, he explains the reasoning behind his decision and his philosophy that puts his community and their future generations at the centre of his planning.

The Keralan Cowboy

The Keralan Cowboy ~ Kerala, IndiaChandran Master, a retired school teacher in Kerala, India, has been collecting Indian indigenous cows for about 25 years. He began collecting because he was shocked at the rapid decline of local species within his area. The problem, Chandran argues, is that if small farmers were supported by government, then their cows could produce more than enough milk, not only for Indian consumption but also for export. The yields are lower than they should be because the cows do not have access to enough food or water.This is a film about the importance of bio-diversity and questioning the economically driven government policy that will have a profound effect on our society and environment. The Source Project tweet

Posted by The Rules on Saturday, 18 July 2015 tweet

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Chandran Master, a retired school teacher in Kerala, India, has been collecting Indian indigenous cows for about 25 years. He began collecting because he was shocked at the rapid decline of local species within his area. The problem, Chandran argues, is that if small farmers were supported by government, then their cows could produce more than enough milk, not only for Indian consumption but also for export.

Partners

A huge thank you to our media partners who are helping us get these films to as wide an audience as possible.

Common Dreams

Gaia Foundation

Global Justice Now

Occupy.com

STEPS International

Share The World’s Resources (STWR)

The Other 98%

TruthOut

Youth Ki Awaaz

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Trump: Join us in connecting the dots

The election of Donald Trump has left millions, maybe even billions of us in shock. Although we may be looking with bewilderment at the US today, we should remember that he is not an isolated phenomenon. He is a symptom of a sickness that is raging all around the world. People are hurting, disillusioned with mainstream politics and increasingly angry at a neoliberal economic system that is destroying lives and the planet with increasing ferocity. And in their desperation they are willing to consider extreme measures to make themselves heard.

Demagogues thrive amid fear and insecurity, which is why they paint the world in such dark terms. It’s a strategy that has put right-wing populist leaders in power in an Axis of Egos: from Brazil to Turkey, the Philippines to Russia, authoritarian strongmen like Trump are on the rise. Meanwhile, many centrist liberals, like the Democratic Party in the US, have been so intent on rejecting left-wing populist solutions, and so sure of their ability to beat anyone running on a white supremacy platform with its misogyny and homophobia, that they opened the door for Mr. Trump to walk straight through. Their preference is always to maintain the status quo that has served them so well.

As dangerous as the election of Trump is for the world, we can also see in this moment the truth that we simply cannot rely on the electoral political system to save us, because it is designed to prevent the fundamental change we need. Its own survival is at stake and it will marshal all its champions and resources to defend itself and stop the emergence of a new system. But when we work, or continue working for change from the ground up; when we build or keep on building new ways of living and being with each other where we live; when we construct or keep constructing the future we know is possible with our own hands, rather than hoping distant leaders will build it for us, we find our true power. Finally, when we combine that with the unbending hope that has powered change through the ages, we know our power has meaning.

A 400-year-old economic system is dying and another is struggling to be born. Change on this scale is not going to be smooth or easy. We should not be surprised, then, that moments like this — where the establishment is dealt a body blow — become more and more common. We can despair when that blow comes in the form of right-wing extremists, or we can step-up. We are the ones we are looking for, who can and must grasp the opportunities in these crises that are undoubtedly there.

So it’s time to come together, taking time to remember the earth. Remember all the successful struggles for justice that came before us, and imagine all those to come. Remember that social movements are growing all over the world and realising the common struggle. Remember life. Then, organise. Find each other and help midwife the inevitable transition that brings forth from the ashes of neoliberal capitalism a system that works for the good of all life on Mother Earth. This is not just activism; this is our responsibility as human beings alive as this all unfolds.

This is why we are here.